Coming to Work: Skilled Workers. How Will This Work in Practice?

The UK’s New Points-Based Immigration Routes: Coming to Work: Skilled Workers: How Will This Work in Practice?

This article is a part of the UK’s New Points-Based Immigration System’ article/video series. Here is I’ll cover in this article/video series:

 

Coming to Work: Skilled Workers. How Will This Work in Practice?
the UK’s New Points-Based Immigration System

The easiest way to get access to all the articles and the videos, which I’ve already created is to go to https://ukvisasuccess.com/newpbs. It is entirely free, and the information will be with you within a few seconds.

In the PREVIOUS ARTICLES/VIDEOS, we looked at the main principles behind the UK’s new Points-Based Immigration route for skilled workers. In this video, I would like us to check a few case-scenarios to see how these rules will operate in practice.

 

The Basics

From previous articles, you may recall that all skilled workers will need to score 70 points to succeed in their Points-Based System applications.

There are two types of points: tradable and non-tradable. You can ‘mix and match’ tradable points (20 points maximum). Non-tradable points (minimum 50 points) are mandatory; you cannot mix and match them.

Non-Tradable Points

Non-tradeable points (mandatory) – 50 required

 

An offer of a job by an approved sponsor

 

20

 

Job at an appropriate skill level

 

20

 

English language skills at level B1 (intermediate)

 

10

 

 

Tradeable Points

Tradeable points – 20 required

 

Education qualification: PhD in a subject relevant to the job. The Sponsors will need to explain how the PhD is relevant to the job offer. 10
Salary of at least £23,040 (or at least 90% of the ‘going rate’ for the profession, whichever salary is higher) 10

 

Job in a shortage occupation

 

20
Salary of at least £20,480 (only if a job is in the health/education sector, public service occupations (except nurses and midwives)) 20

 

Salary of at least £25,600 (or at least the going rate for the profession.) 20
Education qualification: PhD in a STEM subject relevant to the job. STEM = science, technology, engineer and math 20
The applicant is a new entrant to the labour market

 

20

 

The Lab Technician Case

Coming to Work Skilled Workers. How Will This Work in Practice
Coming to Work Skilled Workers. How Will This Work in Practice

Ben is a skilled worker from Canada. He has a PhD in chemistry. He wants to come to the UK to work as a lab technical (chemistry field). The Home Office registered UK employer invited Ben to work in their laboratory. Ben will be working for a salary of £20,700 gross a year. Will he qualify? Here is how we should analyse this case:

 

Step 1: Do They Score 50 mandatory (non-tradable marks)?

There is a job offer = 20 marks

Ben meets this requirement as he received a job offer from the Home Office registered Sponsor

The job is at an appropriate skill level = 20 marks

Ben also meets this requirement. The Home Office classes laboratory analysts, laboratory technicians, medical laboratory assistants, scientific technicians and water testers as ‘laboratory technicians’. Laboratory technician’s job is a job at an appropriate skill level.

To score the final 10 mandatory marks, Ben needs to show that he has

English language skills at level B1 (intermediate) or above = 10 marks

This requirement is very easy for Ben to satisfy as Canada is on the Home Office’s majority English speaking country list. So, Ben meets this requirement automatically.

Step 1 results: Success = 50 marks

 

Step 2: Do They Score 20 non-mandatory (tradable marks)?

2.a: Salary rate is at least £25,600 or above the ‘going rate for that profession’ = 20 marks if not

2.b: Is the salary is above the minimum salary rate of £20,480? If ‘no’ the application fails. If ‘yes’

2.c: Is the salary at the level of the ‘going rate’ for that profession? If not, is it at least ‘75% from the going rate? If not, the application will be refused.

2.d: ‘Is it on shortage occupation list?’= 20 marks

 

We know that Ben’s salary is below £25,600. It means that he cannot score marks for the salary. However, we also know that it is above the minimum salary rate of £20,700 gross a year. Then we need to check if the salary is above the ‘going rate’ for that profession.

‘The going rate’ for Laboratory technician is £18,200 (or at least £8.97 per hour)

It means that Ben can still score 20 tradeable points elsewhere to be eligible for a visa. Ben can get 20 extra points by having a relevant STEM PhD in chemistry. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. It refers to subjects that fall under these disciplines.

 

STEM Subjects

The list of STEM subjects is big:

  • Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Design and technology
  • Math
  • Information and communications technology
  • Computer science
  • Economics
  • Geography

This list is non-exhaustive.

Coming to Work: Skilled Workers. How Will This Work in Practice?

The Lab Technician Case Results

Ben will likely succeed in his application under the UK New Points-Based System.

He scored 50 mandatory marks and 20 tradable marks.

 

Coming to Work: Skilled Workers: How Will This Work in Practice?

The Mechanical Engineer Case

Coming to Work Skilled Workers. How Will This Work in Practice
Coming to Work Skilled Workers. How Will This Work in Practice

Anna is a national of Cuba. She wants to work in the UK as a mechanical engineer. The UK based Home Office recognised Sponsor offered her a permanent job £28,900 gross per year. Last month she passed her B1 English language test. Will Anna succeed in her UK New Points-Based System application?

 

Step 1: Do They Score 50 mandatory (non-tradable marks)?

There is a job offer = 20 marks

Anna meets this requirement as she received a job offer from the Home Office registered Sponsor.

The job is at an appropriate skill level = 20 marks

Anna also meets this requirement. ‘Mechanical engineers’ are on the Home Office’s list. The profession includes professional aeronautical engineers, aerospace engineers, professional automotive engineer, professional marine engineers and professional mechanical engineers.

Anna needs 10 mandatory marks for the meeting:

English language skills at level B1 (intermediate) or above = 10 marks

She also meets this requirement.

Step 1 results: Success = 50 marks

 

Step 2: Do They Score 20 non-mandatory (tradable marks)?

2.a: Salary rate is at least £25,600 or above the ‘going rate for that profession’ = 20 marks if not

2.b: Is the salary is above the minimum salary rate of £20,480? If ‘no’ the application fails. If ‘yes’

2.c: Is the salary at the level of the ‘going rate’ for that profession? If not, is it at least ‘75% from the going rate? If not, the application will be refused.

2.d: ‘Is it on shortage occupation list?’= 20 marks

 

Anna’ proposed salary is higher than the £25,600 general salary threshold. However,  the Home Office’s ‘going rate’ (minimum acceptable salary for this profession) for Mechanical Engineers £33,400 (or £16.47 per hour). The ‘going rate’ is higher than the proposed salary. For the application to have viable chances of survival, the salary should be at least 80% of the ‘going rate’ for the relevant position.

Anna’s proposed salary is above 87% of the going rate for his occupation, therefore while he scores no points from his salary:

£33,400 = 100%

£28,900  = x

X = (£28,900 x 100) / 33,400

X = 86.52%

Anna can, therefore, score 20 tradeable points elsewhere to be eligible for a visa. In this instance, Anna scores the 20 extra points by having a job offer in a shortage occupation.

You’ll see from the table below how Anna has accumulated her 70 points:

  Characteristic Points Total
 

Mandatory

The offer of a job by an approved sponsor 20  

50

Job at an appropriate skill level 20
English language skills at level B1 (intermediate) 10
Tradable Salary of at least 80% of the going rate 0 20
Job in a shortage occupation 20
Total 70

 

Coming to Work: Skilled Workers. How Will This Work in Practice?